Recent comments on posts in the blog:

Why encrypt DNS?

Why encrypt DNS when your browser still leaks the domain name via SNI extension, even though it runs over https? https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Server_Name_Indication

Comment by Jonathan
Re: comment 2

Not sure if dnscrypt-proxy caches but it doesn't seem that useful as general advise if it doesn't and everyone uses a proxy in Iceland.

I don't believe that dnsproxy-crypt caches (the name implies it doesn't), but Unbound does.

Comment by francois
comment 2
There is a reason why every ISP provides a recursor: latency. Every new connection that uses a name (unless cached locally with a caching resolver), every newly launched binary that connects somewhere needs to bear DNS latency. Not sure if dnscrypt-proxy caches but it doesn't seem that useful as general advise if it doesn't and everyone uses a proxy in Iceland.
Comment by Philipp Kern
Captive portals

FWIW, my usual solution to captive portals is to add some exceptions to the DNS resolution/HTTP proxy, which forces enough requests to go "directly" to be able to log into the captive portal. Eg, the domain of the place I'm staying in, and the domain of whatever Wifi provider they're using. Then I trigger the captive port by, eg, trying to go to the domain of the place I'm staying in. Over time one could accumulate a list of such exceptions required (and it seems like something that could be crowd sourced).

For better privacy one would perhaps want to selectively enable these exceptions based on the current location (and/or selectively disable them if at known locations like home/work/etc when it's not needed).

Ewen

PS: If your names are resolved from a location far away from you, you'll also generally get CDN nodes which are far away from you. Which may lead to poor performance. YMMV.

Comment by Ewen McNeill
Exceptions
Do "network.cookie.lifetimePolicy" and "network.cookie.lifetime.days" affect exception domains that I explicitly set to allow cookies?
Comment by Paul
text format

Following this STACKOVERFLOW's question, if the dump format is text

$ sed -n -e '/COPY.*mytable/,/CREATE TABLE/p' pg_whole.dump > mytable.dump

works fine

Comment by gunzapper
Must use full path to file

This might be common sense but...

-> pwd /home/foo

-> git log -- bar

This will return nothing

-> git log -- baz/bar

This will return the history of the file bar in the directory baz

Comment by Tom