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Creating a Kodia media PC using a Raspberry Pi 4

Here's how I set up a media PC using Kodi (formerly XMBC) and a Raspberry Pi 4.

Hardware

The hardware is fairly straightforward, but here's what I ended up getting:

You'll probably want to add a remote control to that setup. I used an old Streamzap I had lying around.

Installing the OS on the SD-card

Plug the SD card into a computer using a USB adapter.

Download the imager and use it to install Raspbian on the SDcard.

Then you can simply plug the SD card into the Pi and boot.

System configuration

Using sudo raspi-config, I changed the following:

  • Set hostname (System Options)
  • Wait for network at boot (System Options): needed for NFS
  • Disable screen blanking (Display Options)
  • Enable ssh (Interface Options)
  • Configure locale, timezone and keyboard (Localisation Options)
  • Set WiFi country (Localisation Options)

Then I enabled automatic updates:

apt install unattended-upgrades anacron

echo 'Unattended-Upgrade::Origins-Pattern {
        "origin=Debian,codename=${distro_codename},label=Debian";
        "origin=Debian,codename=${distro_codename},label=Debian-Security";
        "origin=Raspbian,codename=${distro_codename},label=Raspbian";
        "origin=Raspberry Pi Foundation,codename=${distro_codename},label=Raspberry Pi Foundation";
};' | sudo tee /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/51unattended-upgrades-raspbian

Headless setup

Should you need to do the setup without a monitor, you can enable ssh by inserting the SD card into a computer and then creating an empty file called ssh in the boot partition.

Plug it into your router and boot it up. Check the IP that it received by looking at the active DHCP leases in your router's admin panel.

Then login:

ssh -o PreferredAuthentications=password -o PubkeyAuthentication=no pi@192.168.1.xxx

using the default password of raspberry.

Hardening

In order to secure the Pi, I followed most of the steps I usually take when setting up a new Linux server.

I created a new user account for admin and ssh access:

adduser francois
addgroup sshuser
adduser francois sshuser
adduser francois sudo

and changed the pi user password to a random one:

pwgen -sy 32
sudo passwd pi

before removing its admin permissions:

deluser pi adm
deluser pi sudo
deluser pi dialout
deluser pi cdrom
deluser pi lpadmin

Finally, I enabled the Uncomplicated Firewall by installing its package:

apt install ufw

and only allowing ssh connections.

After starting ufw using systemctl start ufw.service, you can check that it's configured as expected using ufw status. It should display the following:

Status: active

To                         Action      From
--                         ------      ----
22/tcp                     ALLOW       Anywhere
22/tcp (v6)                ALLOW       Anywhere (v6)

Installing Kodi

Kodi is very straightforward to install since it's now part of the Raspbian repositories:

apt install kodi

To make it start at boot/login, while still being able to exit and use other apps if needed:

cp /etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/
echo "@kodi" >> ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart

Network File System

In order to avoid having to have all media storage connected directly to the Pi via USB, I setup an NFS share over my local network.

First, give static IP allocations to the server and the Pi in your DHCP server, then add it to the /etc/hosts file on your NFS server:

192.168.1.3    pi

Install the NFS server package:

apt instal nfs-kernel-server

Setup the directories to share in /etc/exports:

/pub/movies    pi(ro,insecure,all_squash,subtree_check)
/pub/tv_shows  pi(ro,insecure,all_squash,subtree_check)

Open the right ports on your firewall by putting this in /etc/network/iptables.up.rules:

-A INPUT -s 192.168.1.3 -p udp -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p tcp --dport 111 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p udp --dport 111 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p udp --dport 123 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p tcp --dport 600:1124 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p udp --dport 600:1124 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p tcp --dport 2049 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 192.168.1.0/24 -p udp --dport 2049 -j ACCEPT

Finally, apply all of these changes:

iptables-apply
systemctl restart nfs-kernel-server.service

On the Pi, put the server's static IP in /etc/hosts:

192.168.1.2    fileserver

and this in /etc/fstab:

fileserver:/data/movies  /kodi/movies  nfs  ro,bg,hard,noatime,async,nolock  0  0
fileserver:/data/tv      /kodi/tv      nfs  ro,bg,hard,noatime,async,nolock  0  0

Then create the mount points and mount everything:

mkdir -p /kodi/movies
mkdir /kodi/tv
mount /kodi/movies
mount /kodi/tv
Programming a DMR radio with its CPS

Here are some notes I took around programming my AnyTone AT-D878UV radio to operate on DMR using the CPS software that comes with it.

Note that you can always tune in to a VFO channel by hand if you haven't had time to add it to your codeplug yet.

DMR terminology

First of all, the terminology of DMR is quite different from that of the regular analog FM world.

Here are the basic terms:

  • Frequency: same meaning as in the analog world
  • Repeater: same meaning as in the analog world
  • Timeslot: Each frequency is split into two timeslots (1 and 2) and what that means that there can be two simultaneous transmissions on each frequency.
  • Color code: This is the digital equivalent of a CTCSS tone (sometimes called privacy tone) in that using the incorrect code means that you will tie up one of the timeslots on the frequency, but nobody else will hear you. These are not actually named after colors, but are instead just numerical IDs from 0 to 15.

There are two different identification mechanisms (both are required):

  • Callsign: This is the same identifier issued to you by your country's amateur radio authority. Mine is VA7GPL.
  • Radio ID: This is a unique numerical ID tied to your callsign which you must register for ahead of time and program into your radio. Mine is 3027260.

The following is where this digital mode becomes most interesting:

  • Talkgroup: a "chat room" where everything you say will be heard by anybody listening to that talkgroup
  • Network: a group of repeaters connected together over the Internet (typically) and sharing a common list of talkgroups
  • Hotspot: a personal simplex device which allows you to connect to a network with your handheld and access all of the talkgroups available on that network

The most active network these days is Brandmeister, but there are several others.

  • Access: This can either be Always on which means that a talkgroup will be permanently broadcasting on a timeslot and frequency, or PTT which means a talkgroup will not be broadcast until it is first "woken up" by pressing the push-to-talk button and then will broadcast for a certain amount of time before going to sleep again.
  • Channel: As in the analog world, this is what you select on your radio when you want to talk to a group of people. In the digital world however, it is tied not only to a frequency (and timeslot) and tone (color code), but also to a specific talkgroup.

Ultimately what you want to do when you program your radio is to find the talkgroups you are interested in (from the list offered by your local repeater) and then assign them to specific channel numbers on your radio. More on that later.

Callsign and Radio IDs

Before we get to talkgroups, let's set your callsign and Radio ID:

Then you need to download the latest list of Radio IDs so that your radio can display people's names and callsigns instead of just their numerical IDs.

One approach is to only download the list of users who recently talked on talkgroups you are interested in. For example, I used to download the contacts for the following talkgroups: 91,93,95,913,937,3026,3027,302,30271,30272,530,5301,5302,5303,5304,3100,3153,31330 but these days, what I normally do is to just download the entire worldwide database (user.csv) since my radio still has enough storage (200k entries) for it.

In order for the user.csv file to work with the AnyTone CPS, it needs to have particular columns and use the DOS end-of-line characters (apt install dos2unix if you want to do it manually). I wrote a script to do all of the work for me.

If you use dmrconfig to program this radio instead, then the conversion is unnecessary. The user.csv file can be used directly, however it will be truncated due to an incorrect limit hard-coded in the software.

Talkgroups

Next, you need to pick the talkgroups you would like to allocate to specific channels on your radio.

Start by looking at the documentation for your local repeaters (e.g. VE7RAG and VE7NWR in the Vancouver area).

In addition to telling you the listen and transmit frequencies of the repeater (again, this works the same way as with analog FM), these will tell you which talkgroups are available and what timeslots and color codes they have been set to. It will also tell you the type of access for each of these talkgroups.

This is how I programmed a channel:

and a talkgroup on the VE7RAG repeater in my radio:

If you don't have a local repeater with DMR capability, or if you want to access talkgroups available on a different network, then you will need to get a DMR hotspot such as one that's compatible with the Pi-Star software.

This is an excerpt from the programming I created for the talkgroups I made available through my hotspot:

One of the unfortunate limitations of the CPS software for the AnyTone 878 is that talkgroup numbers are globally unique identifiers. This means that if TG1234 (hypothetical example) is Ragchew 3000 on DMR-MARC but Iceland-wide chat on Brandmeister, then you can't have two copies of it with different names. The solution I found for this was to give that talkgroup the name "TG1234" instead of "Ragchew3k" or "Iceland". I use a more memorable name for non-conflicting talkgroups, but for the problematic ones, I simply repeat the talkgroup number.

Simplex

Talkgroups are not required to operate on DMR. Just like analog FM, you can talk to another person point-to-point using a simplex channel.

The convention for all simplex channels is the following:

  • Talkgroup: 99
  • Color code: 1
  • Timeslot: 1
  • Admit criteria: Always
  • In Call Criteria: TX or Always

After talking to the British Columbia Amateur Radio Coordination Council, I found that the following frequency ranges are most suitable for DMR simplex:

  • 145.710-145.790 MHz (simplex digital transmissions)
  • 446.000-446.975 MHz (all simplex modes)

The VECTOR list identifies two frequencies in particular:

  • 446.075 MHz
  • 446.500 MHz

Learn more

If you'd like to learn more about DMR, I would suggest you start with this excellent guide (also mirrored here).

List of Planet Linux Australia blogs

I've been following Planet Linux Australia for many years and discovered many interesting FOSS blogs through it. I was sad to see that it got shut down a few weeks ago and so I decided to manually add all of the feeds to my RSS reader to avoid missing posts from people I have been indirectly following for years.

Since all feeds have been removed from the site, I recovered the list of blogs available from an old copy of the site preserved by the Internet Archive.

Here is the resulting .opml file if you'd like to subscribe.

Changes

Once I had the full list, I removed all blogs that are gone, empty or broken (e.g. domain not resolving, returning a 404, various database or server errors).

I updated the URLs of a few blogs which had moved but hadn't updated their feeds on the planet. I also updated the name of a blogger who was still listed under a previous last name.

Finally, I removed LA-specific tags from feeds since these are unlikely to be used again.

Work-arounds

The following LiveJournal feeds didn't work in my RSS reader but opened fine in a browser:

However since none of them have them updated in the last 7 years, I just left them out.

A couple appear to be impossible to fetch over Tor, presumably due to a Cloudflare setting:

Since only the last two have been updated in the last 9 years, I added these to Feedburner and added the following "proxied" URLs to my reader:

Similarly, I couldn't fetch the following over Tor for some other reasons:

I excluded the first two which haven't been updated in 6 years and proxied the other ones:

Opting your domain out of programmatic advertising

A few years ago, the advertising industry introduced the ads.txt project in order to defend against widespread domain spoofing vulnerabilities in programmatic advertising.

I decided to use this technology to opt out of having ads sold for my domains, at least through ad exchanges which perform this check, by hosting a text file containing this:

contact=ads@fmarier.org

at the following locations:

(In order to get this to work on my blog, running Ikiwiki on Branchable, I had to disable the txt plugin in order to get ads.txt to be served as a plain text file instead of being automatically rendered as HTML.)

Specification

The key parts of the specification for our purposes are:

[3.1] If the server response indicates the resource does not exist (HTTP Status Code 404), the advertising system can assume no declarations exist and that no advertising system is unauthorized to buy and sell ads on the website.

[3.2.1] Some publishers may choose to not authorize any advertising system by publishing an empty ads.txt file, indicating that no advertising system is authorized to buy and sell ads on the website. So that consuming systems properly read and interpret the empty file (differentiating between web servers returning error pages for the /ads.txt URL), at least one properly formatted line must be included which adheres to the format specification described above.

As you can see, the specification sadly ignores RFC8615 and requires that the ads.txt file be present directly in the root of your web server, like the venerable robots.txt file, but unlike the newer security.txt standard.

If you don't want to provide an email address in your ads.txt file, the specification recommends using the following line verbatim:

placeholder.example.com, placeholder, DIRECT, placeholder

Validation

A number of online validators exist, but I used the following to double-check my setup:

Removing a corrupted data pack in a Restic backup

I recently ran into a corrupted data pack in a Restic backup on my GnuBee. It led to consistent failures during the prune operation:

incomplete pack file (will be removed): b45afb51749c0778de6a54942d62d361acf87b513c02c27fd2d32b730e174f2e
incomplete pack file (will be removed): c71452fa91413b49ea67e228c1afdc8d9343164d3c989ab48f3dd868641db113
incomplete pack file (will be removed): 10bf128be565a5dc4a46fc2fc5c18b12ed2e77899e7043b28ce6604e575d1463
incomplete pack file (will be removed): df282c9e64b225c2664dc6d89d1859af94f35936e87e5941cee99b8fbefd7620
incomplete pack file (will be removed): 1de20e74aac7ac239489e6767ec29822ffe52e1f2d7f61c3ec86e64e31984919
hash does not match id: want 8fac6efe99f2a103b0c9c57293a245f25aeac4146d0e07c2ab540d91f23d3bb5, got 2818331716e8a5dd64a610d1a4f85c970fd8ae92f891d64625beaaa6072e1b84
github.com/restic/restic/internal/repository.Repack
        github.com/restic/restic/internal/repository/repack.go:37
main.pruneRepository
        github.com/restic/restic/cmd/restic/cmd_prune.go:242
main.runPrune
        github.com/restic/restic/cmd/restic/cmd_prune.go:62
main.glob..func19
        github.com/restic/restic/cmd/restic/cmd_prune.go:27
github.com/spf13/cobra.(*Command).execute
        github.com/spf13/cobra/command.go:838
github.com/spf13/cobra.(*Command).ExecuteC
        github.com/spf13/cobra/command.go:943
github.com/spf13/cobra.(*Command).Execute
        github.com/spf13/cobra/command.go:883
main.main
        github.com/restic/restic/cmd/restic/main.go:86
runtime.main
        runtime/proc.go:204
runtime.goexit
        runtime/asm_amd64.s:1374

Thanks to the excellent support forum, I was able to resolve this issue by dropping a single snapshot.

First, I identified the snapshot which contained the offending pack:

$ restic -r sftp:hostname.local: find --pack 8fac6efe99f2a103b0c9c57293a245f25aeac4146d0e07c2ab540d91f23d3bb5
repository b0b0516c opened successfully, password is correct
Found blob 2beffa460d4e8ca4ee6bf56df279d1a858824f5cf6edc41a394499510aa5af9e
 ... in file /home/francois/.local/share/akregator/Archive/http___udd.debian.org_dmd_feed_
     (tree 602b373abedca01f0b007fea17aa5ad2c8f4d11f1786dd06574068bf41e32020)
 ... in snapshot 5535dc9d (2020-06-30 08:34:41)

Then, I could simply drop that snapshot:

$ restic -r sftp:hostname.local: forget 5535dc9d
repository b0b0516c opened successfully, password is correct
[0:00] 100.00%  1 / 1 files deleted

and run the prune command to remove the snapshot, as well as the incomplete packs that were also mentioned in the above output but could never be removed due to the other error:

$ restic -r sftp:hostname.local: prune
repository b0b0516c opened successfully, password is correct
counting files in repo
building new index for repo
[20:11] 100.00%  77439 / 77439 packs
incomplete pack file (will be removed): b45afb51749c0778de6a54942d62d361acf87b513c02c27fd2d32b730e174f2e
incomplete pack file (will be removed): c71452fa91413b49ea67e228c1afdc8d9343164d3c989ab48f3dd868641db113
incomplete pack file (will be removed): 10bf128be565a5dc4a46fc2fc5c18b12ed2e77899e7043b28ce6604e575d1463
incomplete pack file (will be removed): df282c9e64b225c2664dc6d89d1859af94f35936e87e5941cee99b8fbefd7620
incomplete pack file (will be removed): 1de20e74aac7ac239489e6767ec29822ffe52e1f2d7f61c3ec86e64e31984919
repository contains 77434 packs (2384522 blobs) with 367.648 GiB
processed 2384522 blobs: 1165510 duplicate blobs, 47.331 GiB duplicate
load all snapshots
find data that is still in use for 15 snapshots
[1:11] 100.00%  15 / 15 snapshots
found 1006062 of 2384522 data blobs still in use, removing 1378460 blobs
will remove 5 invalid files
will delete 13728 packs and rewrite 15140 packs, this frees 142.285 GiB
[4:58:20] 100.00%  15140 / 15140 packs rewritten
counting files in repo
[18:58] 100.00%  50164 / 50164 packs
finding old index files
saved new indexes as [340cb68f 91ff77ef ee21a086 3e5fa853 084b5d4b 3b8d5b7a d5c385b4 5eff0be3 2cebb212 5e0d9244 29a36849 8251dcee 85db6fa2 29ed23f6 fb306aba 6ee289eb 0a74829d]
remove 190 old index files
[0:00] 100.00%  190 / 190 files deleted
remove 28868 old packs
[1:23] 100.00%  28868 / 28868 files deleted
done
Recovering from a corrupt MariaDB index page

I ran into a corrupt MariaDB index page the other day and had to restore my MythTV database from the automatic backups I make as part of my regular maintainance tasks.

Signs of trouble

My troubles started when my daily backup failed on this line:

mysqldump --opt mythconverg -umythtv -pPASSWORD > mythconverg-200200923T1117.sql

with this error message:

mysqldump: Error 1034: Index for table 'recordedseek' is corrupt; try to repair it when dumping table `recordedseek` at row: 4059895

Comparing the dump that was just created to the database dumps in /var/backups/mythtv/, it was clear that it was incomplete since it was about 100 MB smaller.

I first tried a gentle OPTIMIZE TABLE recordedseek as suggested in this StackExchange answer but that caused the database to segfault:

mysqld[9141]: 2020-09-23 15:02:46 0 [ERROR] InnoDB: Database page corruption on disk or a failed file read of tablespace mythconverg/recordedseek page [page id: space=115871, page number=11373]. You may have to recover from a backup.
mysqld[9141]: 2020-09-23 15:02:46 0 [Note] InnoDB: Page dump in ascii and hex (16384 bytes):
mysqld[9141]:  len 16384; hex 06177fa70000...
mysqld[9141]:  C     K     c      {\;
mysqld[9141]: InnoDB: End of page dump
mysqld[9141]: 2020-09-23 15:02:46 0 [Note] InnoDB: Uncompressed page, stored checksum in field1 102203303, calculated checksums for field1: crc32 806650270, innodb 1139779342,  page type 17855 == INDEX.none 3735928559, stored checksum in field2 102203303, calculated checksums for field2: crc32 806650270, innodb 3322209073, none 3735928559,  page LSN 148 2450029404, low 4 bytes of LSN at page end 2450029404, page number (if stored to page already) 11373, space id (if created with >= MySQL-4.1.1 and stored already) 115871
mysqld[9141]: 2020-09-23 15:02:46 0 [Note] InnoDB: Page may be an index page where index id is 697207
mysqld[9141]: 2020-09-23 15:02:46 0 [Note] InnoDB: Index 697207 is `PRIMARY` in table `mythconverg`.`recordedseek`
mysqld[9141]: 2020-09-23 15:02:46 0 [Note] InnoDB: It is also possible that your operating system has corrupted its own file cache and rebooting your computer removes the error. If the corrupt page is an index page. You can also try to fix the corruption by dumping, dropping, and reimporting the corrupt table. You can use CHECK TABLE to scan your table for corruption. Please refer to https://mariadb.com/kb/en/library/innodb-recovery-modes/ for information about forcing recovery.
mysqld[9141]: 200923 15:02:46 2020-09-23 15:02:46 0 [ERROR] InnoDB: Failed to read file './mythconverg/recordedseek.ibd' at offset 11373: Page read from tablespace is corrupted.
mysqld[9141]: [ERROR] mysqld got signal 11 ;
mysqld[9141]: Core pattern: |/lib/systemd/systemd-coredump %P %u %g %s %t 9223372036854775808 %h ...
kernel: [820233.893658] mysqld[9186]: segfault at 90 ip 0000557a229f6d90 sp 00007f69e82e2dc0 error 4 in mysqld[557a224ef000+803000]
kernel: [820233.893665] Code: c4 20 83 bd e4 eb ff ff 44 48 89 ...
systemd[1]: mariadb.service: Main process exited, code=killed, status=11/SEGV
systemd[1]: mariadb.service: Failed with result 'signal'.
systemd-coredump[9240]: Process 9141 (mysqld) of user 107 dumped core.#012#012Stack trace of thread 9186: ...
systemd[1]: mariadb.service: Service RestartSec=5s expired, scheduling restart.
systemd[1]: mariadb.service: Scheduled restart job, restart counter is at 1.
mysqld[9260]: 2020-09-23 15:02:52 0 [Warning] Could not increase number of max_open_files to more than 16364 (request: 32186)
mysqld[9260]: 2020-09-23 15:02:53 0 [Note] InnoDB: Starting crash recovery from checkpoint LSN=638234502026
...
mysqld[9260]: 2020-09-23 15:02:53 0 [Note] InnoDB: Recovered page [page id: space=115875, page number=5363] from the doublewrite buffer.
mysqld[9260]: 2020-09-23 15:02:53 0 [Note] InnoDB: Starting final batch to recover 2 pages from redo log.
mysqld[9260]: 2020-09-23 15:02:53 0 [Note] InnoDB: Waiting for purge to start
mysqld[9260]: 2020-09-23 15:02:53 0 [Note] Recovering after a crash using tc.log
mysqld[9260]: 2020-09-23 15:02:53 0 [Note] Starting crash recovery...
mysqld[9260]: 2020-09-23 15:02:53 0 [Note] Crash recovery finished.

and so I went with the nuclear option of dropping the MythTV database and restoring from backup.

Dropping the corrupt database

First of all, I shut down MythTV as root:

killall mythfrontend
systemctl stop mythtv-status.service
systemctl stop mythtv-backend.service

and took a full copy of my MariaDB databases just in case:

systemctl stop mariadb.service
cd /var/lib
apack /root/var-lib-mysql-20200923T1215.tgz mysql/
systemctl start mariadb.service

before dropping the MythTV databse (mythconverg):

$ mysql -pPASSWORD

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;
+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| mythconverg        |
| performance_schema |
+--------------------+
4 rows in set (0.000 sec)

MariaDB [(none)]> drop database mythconverg;
Query OK, 114 rows affected (25.564 sec)

MariaDB [(none)]> quit
Bye

Restoring from backup

Then I re-created an empty database:

mysql -pPASSWORD < /usr/share/mythtv/sql/mc.sql

and restored the last DB dump prior to the detection of the corruption:

sudo -i -u mythtv
/usr/share/mythtv/mythconverg_restore.pl --directory /var/backups/mythtv --filename mythconverg-1350-20200923010502.sql.gz

In order to restart everything properly, I simply rebooted the machine:

systemctl reboot
Copying a GnuBee's root partition onto a new drive

Here is the process I followed when I moved my GnuBee's root partition from one flaky Kingston SSD drive to a brand new Samsung SSD.

It was relatively straightforward, but there are two key points:

  1. Make sure you label the root partition GNUBEE-ROOT.
  2. Make sure you copy the network configuration from the SSD, not the tmpfs mount.

Copy the partition table

First, with both drives plugged in, I replicated the partition table of the first drive (/dev/sda):

# fdisk -l /dev/sda
Disk /dev/sda: 111.8 GiB, 120034123776 bytes, 234441648 sectors
Disk model: KINGSTON SA400S3
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 799CD830-526B-42CE-8EE7-8C94EF098D46

Device       Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sda1     2048   8390655   8388608     4G Linux swap
/dev/sda2  8390656 234441614 226050959 107.8G Linux filesystem

onto the second drive (/dev/sde):

# fdisk /dev/sde

Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.33.1).
Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
Be careful before using the write command.

Device does not contain a recognized partition table.
Created a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0xd011eaba.

Command (m for help): g
Created a new GPT disklabel (GUID: 83F70325-5BE0-034E-A9E1-1965FEFD8E9F).

Command (m for help): n
Partition number (1-128, default 1): 
First sector (2048-488397134, default 2048): 
Last sector, +/-sectors or +/-size{K,M,G,T,P} (2048-488397134, default 488397134): +4G

Created a new partition 1 of type 'Linux filesystem' and of size 4 GiB.

Command (m for help): t
Selected partition 1
Partition type (type L to list all types): 19
Changed type of partition 'Linux filesystem' to 'Linux swap'.

Command (m for help): n
Partition number (2-128, default 2): 
First sector (8390656-488397134, default 8390656): 
Last sector, +/-sectors or +/-size{K,M,G,T,P} (8390656-488397134, default 488397134): 234441614

Created a new partition 2 of type 'Linux filesystem' and of size 107.8 GiB.

Command (m for help): p
Disk /dev/sde: 232.9 GiB, 250059350016 bytes, 488397168 sectors
Disk model: Samsung SSD 860 
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 83F70325-5BE0-034E-A9E1-1965FEFD8E9F

Device       Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sde1     2048   8390655   8388608     4G Linux swap
/dev/sde2  8390656 234441614 226050959 107.8G Linux filesystem

Command (m for help): w
The partition table has been altered.
Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
Syncing disks.

I wasted a large amount of space on the second drive, but that was on purpose in case I decide to later on move to a RAID-1 root partition with the Kingston SSD.

Format the partitions

Second, I formated the new partitions:

# mkswap /dev/sde1 
Setting up swapspace version 1, size = 4 GiB (4294963200 bytes)
no label, UUID=7a85fbce-2493-45c1-a548-4ec6e827ec29

# mkfs.ext4 /dev/sde2 
mke2fs 1.44.5 (15-Dec-2018)
Discarding device blocks: done                            
Creating filesystem with 28256369 4k blocks and 7069696 inodes
Filesystem UUID: 732a76df-d369-4e7b-857a-dd55fd461bbc
Superblock backups stored on blocks: 
    32768, 98304, 163840, 229376, 294912, 819200, 884736, 1605632, 2654208, 
    4096000, 7962624, 11239424, 20480000, 23887872

Allocating group tables: done                            
Writing inode tables: done                            
Creating journal (131072 blocks): done
Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done   

and labeled the root partition so that the GnuBee can pick it up as it boots up:

e2label /dev/sde2 GNUBEE-ROOT

since GNUBEE-ROOT is what uboot will be looking for.

Copy the data over

Finally, I copied the data over from the original drive to the new one:

# umount /etc/network
# mkdir /mnt/root
# mount /dev/sde2 /mnt/root
# rsync -aHx --delete --exclude=/dev/* --exclude=/proc/* --exclude=/sys/* --exclude=/tmp/* --exclude=/mnt/* --exclude=/lost+found/* --exclude=/media/* --exclude=/rom/* /* /mnt/root/
# sync

Note that if you don't unmount /etc/network/, you'll be copying the override provided at boot time instead of the underlying config that's on the root partition. The reason that this matters is that the script that renames the network interfaces to ethblack and ethblue expects specific files in order to produce a working network configuration. If you copy the final modified config files then you end up with an bind-mounted empty directory as /etc/network, and the network interfaces can't be brought up successfully.

Using a Let's Encrypt TLS certificate with Asterisk 16.2

In order to fix the following error after setting up SIP TLS in Asterisk 16.2:

asterisk[8691]: ERROR[8691]: tcptls.c:966 in __ssl_setup: TLS/SSL error loading cert file. <asterisk.pem>

I created a Let's Encrypt certificate using certbot:

apt install certbot
certbot certonly --standalone -d hostname.example.com

To enable the asterisk user to load the certificate successfuly (it doesn't permission to access to the certificates under /etc/letsencrypt/), I copied it to the right directory:

cp /etc/letsencrypt/live/hostname.example.com/privkey.pem /etc/asterisk/asterisk.key
cp /etc/letsencrypt/live/hostname.example.com/fullchain.pem /etc/asterisk/asterisk.cert
chown asterisk:asterisk /etc/asterisk/asterisk.cert /etc/asterisk/asterisk.key
chmod go-rwx /etc/asterisk/asterisk.cert /etc/asterisk/asterisk.key

Then I set the following variables in /etc/asterisk/sip.conf:

tlscertfile=/etc/asterisk/asterisk.cert
tlsprivatekey=/etc/asterisk/asterisk.key

Automatic renewal

The machine on which I run asterisk has a tricky Apache setup:

  • a webserver is running on port 80
  • port 80 is restricted to the local network

This meant that the certbot domain ownership checks would get blocked by the firewall, and I couldn't open that port without exposing the private webserver to the Internet.

So I ended up disabling the built-in certbot renewal mechanism:

systemctl disable certbot.timer certbot.service
systemctl stop certbot.timer certbot.service

and then writing my own script in /etc/cron.daily/certbot-francois:

#!/bin/bash
TEMPFILE=`mktemp`

# Stop Apache and backup firewall.
/bin/systemctl stop apache2.service
/usr/sbin/iptables-save > $TEMPFILE

# Open up port 80 to the whole world.
/usr/sbin/iptables -D INPUT -j LOGDROP
/usr/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
/usr/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -j LOGDROP

# Renew all certs.
/usr/bin/certbot renew --quiet

# Restore firewall and restart Apache.
/usr/sbin/iptables -D INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
/usr/sbin/iptables-restore < $TEMPFILE
/bin/systemctl start apache2.service

# Copy certificate into asterisk.
cp /etc/letsencrypt/live/hostname.example.com/privkey.pem /etc/asterisk/asterisk.key
cp /etc/letsencrypt/live/hostname.example.com/fullchain.pem /etc/asterisk/asterisk.cert
chown asterisk:asterisk /etc/asterisk/asterisk.cert /etc/asterisk/asterisk.key
chmod go-rwx /etc/asterisk/asterisk.cert /etc/asterisk/asterisk.key
/bin/systemctl restart asterisk.service

# Commit changes to etckeeper.
pushd /etc/ > /dev/null
/usr/bin/git add letsencrypt asterisk
DIFFSTAT="$(/usr/bin/git diff --cached --stat)"
if [ -n "$DIFFSTAT" ] ; then
    /usr/bin/git commit --quiet -m "Renewed letsencrypt certs."
    echo "$DIFFSTAT"
fi
popd > /dev/null
Making an Apache website available as a Tor Onion Service

As part of the #MoreOnionsPorFavor campaign, I decided to follow brave.com's lead and make my homepage available as a Tor onion service.

Tor daemon setup

I started by installing the Tor daemon locally:

apt install tor

and then setting the following in /etc/tor/torrc:

SocksPort 0
SocksPolicy reject *
HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/hidden_service/
HiddenServicePort 80 [2600:3c04::f03c:91ff:fe8c:61ac]:80
HiddenServicePort 443 [2600:3c04::f03c:91ff:fe8c:61ac]:443
HiddenServiceVersion 3
HiddenServiceNonAnonymousMode 1
HiddenServiceSingleHopMode 1

in order to create a version 3 onion service without actually running a Tor relay.

Note that since I am making a public website available over Tor, I do not need the location of the website to be hidden and so I used the same settings as Cloudflare in their public Tor proxy.

Also, I explicitly used the external IPv6 address of my server in the configuration in order to prevent localhost bypasses.

After restarting the Tor daemon to reload the configuration file:

systemctl restart tor.service

I looked for the address of my onion service:

$ cat /var/lib/tor/hidden_service/hostname 
ixrdj3iwwhkuau5tby5jh3a536a2rdhpbdbu6ldhng43r47kim7a3lid.onion

Apache configuration

Next, I enabled a few required Apache modules:

a2enmod mpm_event
a2enmod http2
a2enmod headers

and configured my Apache vhosts in /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/www.conf:

<VirtualHost *:443>
    ServerName fmarier.org
    ServerAlias ixrdj3iwwhkuau5tby5jh3a536a2rdhpbdbu6ldhng43r47kim7a3lid.onion

    Protocols h2, http/1.1
    Header set Onion-Location "http://ixrdj3iwwhkuau5tby5jh3a536a2rdhpbdbu6ldhng43r47kim7a3lid.onion%{REQUEST_URI}s"
    Header set alt-svc 'h2="ixrdj3iwwhkuau5tby5jh3a536a2rdhpbdbu6ldhng43r47kim7a3lid.onion:443"; ma=315360000; persist=1'
    Header add Strict-Transport-Security: "max-age=63072000"

    Include /etc/fmarier-org/www-common.include

    SSLEngine On
    SSLCertificateFile /etc/letsencrypt/live/fmarier.org/fullchain.pem
    SSLCertificateKeyFile /etc/letsencrypt/live/fmarier.org/privkey.pem
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName fmarier.org
    Redirect permanent / https://fmarier.org/
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName ixrdj3iwwhkuau5tby5jh3a536a2rdhpbdbu6ldhng43r47kim7a3lid.onion
    Include /etc/fmarier-org/www-common.include
</VirtualHost>

Note that /etc/fmarier-org/www-common.include contains all of the configuration options that are common to both the HTTP and the HTTPS sites (e.g. document root, caching headers, aliases, etc.).

Finally, I restarted Apache:

apache2ctl configtest
systemctl restart apache2.service

Testing

In order to test that my website is correctly available at its .onion address, I opened the following URLs in a Brave Tor window:

I also checked that the main URL (https://fmarier.org/) exposes a working Onion-Location header which triggers the display of a button in the URL bar (recently merged and available in Brave Nightly):

Testing that the Alt-Svc is working required using the Tor Browser since that's not yet supported in Brave:

  1. Open https://fmarier.org.
  2. Wait 30 seconds.
  3. Reload the page.

On the server side, I saw the following:

2a0b:f4c2:2::1 - - [14/Oct/2020:02:42:20 +0000] "GET / HTTP/2.0" 200 2696 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; rv:78.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/78.0"
2600:3c04::f03c:91ff:fe8c:61ac - - [14/Oct/2020:02:42:53 +0000] "GET / HTTP/2.0" 200 2696 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; rv:78.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/78.0"

That first IP address is from a Tor exit node:

$ whois 2a0b:f4c2:2::1
...
inet6num:       2a0b:f4c2::/40
netname:        MK-TOR-EXIT
remarks:        -----------------------------------
remarks:        This network is used for Tor Exits.
remarks:        We do not have any logs at all.
remarks:        For more information please visit:
remarks:        https://www.torproject.org

which indicates that the first request was not using the .onion address.

The second IP address is the one for my server:

$ dig +short -x 2600:3c04::f03c:91ff:fe8c:61ac
hafnarfjordur.fmarier.org.

which indicates that the second request to Apache came from the Tor relay running on my server, hence using the .onion address.

Upgrading from Ubuntu 18.04 bionic to 20.04 focal

I recently upgraded from Ubuntu 18.04.5 (bionic) to 20.04.1 (focal) and it was one of the roughest Ubuntu upgrades I've gone through in a while. Here are the notes I took on avoiding or fixing the problems I ran into.

Preparation

Before going through the upgrade, I disabled the configurations which I know interfere with the process:

  • Enable etckeeper auto-commits before install by putting the following in /etc/etckeeper/etckeeper.conf:

      AVOID_COMMIT_BEFORE_INSTALL=0
    
  • Remount /tmp as exectuable:

      mount -o remount,exec /tmp
    

Another step I should have taken but didn't, was to temporarily remove safe-rm since it caused some problems related to a Perl upgrade happening at the same time:

apt remove safe-rm

Network problems

After the upgrade, my network settings weren't really working properly and so I started by switching from ifupdown to netplan.io which seems to be the preferred way of configuring the network on Ubuntu now.

Then I found out that netplan.io is not automatically enabling the systemd-resolved handling of .local hostnames.

I would be able to resolve a hostname using avahi:

$ avahi-resolve --name machine.local
machine.local   192.168.1.5

but not with systemd:

$ systemd-resolve machine.local
machine.local: resolve call failed: 'machine.local' not found

$ resolvectl mdns
Global: no
Link 2 (enp4s0): no

The best solution I found involves keeping systemd-resolved and its /etc/resolv.conf symlink to /run/systemd/resolve/stub-resolv.conf.

I added the following in a new /etc/NetworkManager/conf.d/mdns.conf file:

[connection]
connection.mdns=1

which instructs NetworkManager to resolve mDNS on all network interfaces it manages but not register a hostname since that's done by avahi-daemon.

Then I enabled mDNS globally in systemd-resolved by setting the following in /etc/systemd/resolved.conf:

MulticastDNS=yes

before restarting both services:

systemctl restart NetworkManager.service systemd-resolved.service

With that in place, .local hostnames are resolved properly and I can see that mDNS is fully enabled:

$ resolvectl mdns
Global: yes
Link 2 (enp4s0): yes

Boot problems

For some reason I was able to boot with the kernel I got as part of the focal update, but a later kernel update rendered my machine unbootable.

Adding some missing RAID-related modules to /etc/initramfs-tools/modules:

raid1
dmraid
md-raid1

and then re-creating all initramfs:

update-initramfs -u -k all

seemed to do the trick.